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. they are studying the evolution of specialization as they uncover details of ancient economies around the world. in the maya city of copan, a jeweler fashioned rare shell and jade for his powerful lord. in mexico, living artisans echo the economy of a vanished civilization. and in teotihuacan, evidence of mass production has now been unearthed. tiny faces of clay reflect the men and women who made them a thousand years ago. on the other side of the world, in the ancient roman city of ostia, huge merchant ships were part of an economy much like our own. and today, the tanners of morocco still practice their ancient craft, living proof that economies have evolved out of the past. everyone who has ever lived has been part of an economic system. iel bote grande...mil pesos! economic systems are simply the ways people produce, distribute and consume things -- everything and anything, from tortillas to stocks and bonds. for 10,000, 10,000 an eighth. today, as in the past, economic systems lie at the heart of how a society is organized. archaeologists search for these systems because they believe econ
of the excheck kerr. >> mr. speaker, it's taking time, but the british economy is healing. [laughter] after the biggest financial crash of our lifetime, people know that we face each problem at home and abroad. at home we live with the decades of debt and the failure to equip britain to compete in the modern world. and we face a multitude of problems from abroad. the u.s. fiscal cliff, the slowing growth in china, above all the eurozone now in recession. people know that there are no quick fixes to these problems, but they want to know that we are making progress, and the message from today's autumn statement is that we are making progress. it is a hard road, but we're getting there, and britain is on the right track. >> will the chancellor resume his seat. now, look, let's be clear about this. the house knows well enough by now that i will afford a very full opportunity for questioning of the chancellor. but the more interruption, the greater the noise, the longer the session will take, and that cannot be right. so i appeal to members, please, to give the chancellor a courteous hearing as,
this one and that is good for the american economy. >> we look back republican senator rand paul from the state of kentucky. senator paul, welcome, as always. i want to ask you about the fiscal cliff, the state of play. there's revenues on the table. there's tax rate increases on the table. i don't know if there's spending on the table. what's your thinking prigt now? >> that it's a really, really bad idea to raise taxes. if you want your economy to grow, you should do the opposite. we have to cut taxes. that's how i'd fix the economy. leave more money in the private sector. the president is adamant about raising taxes and he's dead wrong. >> there are some people saying we need a deal to avoid a huge tax increase but year end that would throw us into recession. just a thought, would you compromise in terms of let's say a smaller tax rate increase -- let's say the top rate goes to 37% instead of 40%, maybe the threshold goads es to $500,000 $750,000 rather than $250,000? does that interest you? >> no. but what about means testing for entitlement. why don't we say the rich get less soc
economy. no minimum-wage comment no laws against discrimination. if you fire, four weeks termination notice and unemployment is at 2%. >> you can start of business, flexible, hire and fire and it makes it attractive. john: thank you anne jolis and thank god we don't have those dumb laws. we have plenty. weird getting more and people want more like a guaranteed vacation. >> absolutely. we work too hard. france and italy six weeks is normal. john: america does not have mandatory vacation but we have 170,000 pages of federal rules and they keep passing more. it shows how america has recovered since the great depression. to sit out this graph from dan mitchell because of these rules add this up and the government spending, tax increase coming can understand when our entrepreneurs think i do not want to hire people then i want to keep my company small then i am stuck with a mandate. i am worried we become like you're up at the same ti that model is falling apart. john: we did have these laws but not as many. >> as much as seven like the regulated laissez-faire economy just make sure you h
think the ramifications for the economy are too significant. i think we're watching whatever you want to call it, all of the politics playing out, but i still think in the end we'll get a last minute deal. >> i agree. and i think even though the sides are far apart, you have things on the table now. so you can say you're here at 800, 1.6, you kind of -- it gets you somewhere close. somebody will try to say 1.3 versus 1.1, but if you see publicly what they're stating and hopefully privately other things are going on, but it will get done, but it will be very slow. >> john boehner with the proposal he put on the table, i did see commentary from some of the far right saying this is not an acceptable proposal. even his proposal is not acceptable. i did see comment it ter that came through. my question is does the president now have to alienate some of his far left base in order to reach a compromise. >> i think you'll see both of them have to actually bring the parties together. because you won't get everybody happy. some of the people who got voted on the ticket side, no, never. but it w
it to some of the other developed economies, you can see how well australia is holding up. we've seen growth of just 2.5% in the u.s., 1.5% in canada and zero growth in the uk. locally, cutbacks in government spending weighed on the numbers and lower commodity prices also impacted on cash flow and the government is facing more criticism about its effort to keep the budget in surplus while the economy grows. >> the government has had the objective of making sure that we would bring our budget back to surplus when growth has been around trend. what we've been seeking to do through good budget policy has been to provide maximum flexibility to the reserve bank to a just rate so. the government will always put in place appropriate budget settings which will support growth and jobs. >> still, analysts say growth could slow further as the mining investment boom peaks. yesterday, the bank of australia cut interest rates to a record low of 3% and traders are looking further easing next year to offset the falling talks of trade, the high australian daughter and further cutbacks in government spending.
for it and it's destimulative when you need to stimulate the economy. >> and you're talking about, when you take money out of small businesses? >> and adam, he deserves to answer your question. adam? >> he's talking about keeping taxes where they are for the straight majority othe country, charlie. he campaigned on this. he was elected on it, it doesn't matter. >> 50% othe vote on it. >> it doesn't matter, you know that as well as i do. it's only political. >> no, no, no, i'm not-- no, i'm not saying that, i'm saying that there's no rational reason. >> let me finish, charlie. >> and what is the rationality ttreat a small business person who makes $250,000 a year and employs ten people just like steve jobs, warren buffett and-- >> and we quibble? >> let me finish. we can quibble about what the right amount is, whether it's $250,000 or whether it's 500,000, what the president is trying to do. >> and for a while, charles, help me with this part of it. whatever your views on taxes, and i think it's happening and ben stein' earlier point, it's there. andeeply disturbing, where is it, not only there's
and workers. john: singapore has a booming economy. no minimum-wage comment no laws against discrimination. if you fire, four weeks termination notice and unemployment is at 2%. >> you can start of business, flexible, hire and fire and it makes it attractive. john: thank you anne jolis and thank god we don't have those dumb laws. we have plenty. weird getting more and people want more like a guaranteed vacation. >> absolutely. we work too hard. france and italy six weeks is normal. john: america does not have mandatory vacation but we have 170,000 pages of federal rules and they keep passing more. it shows how america has recovered since the great depression. to sit out this graph from dan mitchell because of these rules add this up and the government spending, tax increase coming can understand when our entrepreneurs think i do not want to hire people then i want to keep my company small then i am stuck with a mandate. i am worried we become like you're up at the same time that model is falling apart. john: we did have these laws but not as many. >> as much as seven like the regulated lai
. john: singapore has a booming economy. no minimum-wage comment no laws against discrimination. if you fire, four weeks termination notice and unemployment is at 2%. >> you can srt of business, flexible, hire and fire and it makes it attractive. john: thank you anne jolis and thank god we don't have those dumb laws. we have plenty. weird getting more and people want more like a guaranteed vacation. >> absolutely. we work too hard. france and italy six weeks is normal. john: america does not have mandatory vacation but we have 170,000 pages of federal rules and they keep passing more. it shows how america has recovered since the great depression. sit out this graph from dan mitchell because of these rules add this up a the government spending, tax increase coming can understand when our entrepreneurs think i do not want to hire people then i want to keep my company small then i am stuck with a mandate. i am worried we become like you're up at the same time that model is falling apart. john: we did have these laws but not as many. >> as much as seven like the regulated laissez-faire econ
savings as part of that and invest in things that matter to the american economy. we think we can do that. we have a good chance to do it now. it's important that we do it. i think we're going to get there. >> given tough talk over the weekend, why aren't we waking up to down numbers, red arrows? >> europe is terrific. bond rates are phenomenal. a great run. china numbers are better. i think that there's a lot of people who feel like doug cast does who writes with me with a piece in "the new york times" saying that -- >> most stuff is nontaxable accounts any way. most stocks that people won't be as motivated to sell as people think. of course that doesn't necessarily deal with the increase in payroll taxes and the whole recession side of it. it does deal with the stock market side in terms of selling. >> why not say, listen, fiscal cliff, i have to cut numbers. i have to cut guidance. i think many ceos will cut guidance because of the possibility that the amt is going to -- this alternative minimum tax, people don't know they have to write a check for $3,500 at the end of the year. once y
two acquisitions. plains exploration and mcmoran exploration. >>> concerns over the u.s. economy as adp misses estimates. the blame goes to superstorm sandy. goldman says the party is officially over for gold. >> starbucks at an investors conference will add 1,500 stores in the u.s. over the next five years. wait until you hear what they said about china. >> a big day in media. pandora ceo joins us live later this morning as the stock fell nearly 20% on weak guidance and netflix signs a big exclusive with disney. how much are they having to pay up for that? >>> let's deal with this big deal. as i've been telling you we'll see a lot of big deals -- i was wrong. here we are. freeport mcmoran buying not one but two companies. the combined price if you add it all together gets close to $20 billion. that does include debt. let's go through some of the details. it's somewhat complex. let's start with bigger of the two deals. freeport's purchase of plains. approximately $6.9 billion in total now. it's a cash and stock deal. .6531 shares and 39 bucks a share in cash. that adds up to $50
on to conservative principles very closely. for example, the need for what they call a pro-growth economy, like senator ron johnson. let me play for you what he had to say. >> this president simply doesn't understand that and as a result he's going to punish success, put at risk the economic growth that we really need to create jobs, revenue that we need. >> this is sort of the talking point that we've been hearing all along. is there any indication around capitol hill that there is some softening on that? >> i don't even know what that means, putting -- basically, i believe that the argument is that only by decreasing taxes can you lead to growth. there is a lot of historical evidence that that is not necessarily the case. i think the issue for the gchop right now is whether the tax cuts expire for everyone or whether for only those with income over $250,000. >> let me bring in jim from the national journal. jim, we had a little technical problem there. let me ask you about what she said said. can anything be decided at all until a decision is made about who is going to have tax cuts expire if
to inject money in a credit fashion into their economy. and we certainly think we can bring our fixed income expertise and continue to help them. >> that would make sense for cantor. ireland was the mf-will first they were in trouble, then the model for the world. what got them into trouble again, housing or real estate or something or bad banks or -- and now again they're kind of a model for everyone on how to handle it. is that basically the last five years? >> absolutely. certainly was a real estate bubble there. now there are austerity measures being put in place and they're actually following through on the austerity measures. so certainly they'll come out first and actually look pretty good. >> so where is the most business for you for cantor in ireland, what will you be doing? >> certainly it's an equity based firm. we'll bring our fixed income expertise, probably become the primary dealer there. the irish government will continue to have to have bond issuances as well as corporate debt will start to become a much bigger part of their economy. >> who else looked at this firm, do you k
back this morning, a new report finds that exporting nat gas will actually help the u.s. economy, but not every day is a winner. >>> vice chairman alan blinder will tell us what he thinks. >>> a new study from the federal government shows exporting u.s. natural gas overseas has the potential to reshape the global energy markets. the obama administration has said the study will be central to the decision on whether to export. he said exporting the gas would be a bigger impact on the economy. >> slap in the face of dow chemical. of coke, not coke the beverage company. but this was something that was hotly disputed within the romney campaign. he really let this stuff go because the romney campaign had some very big givers that were chemical companies. >> do we know, say, very bad, how much will prices conceivableably go up if we become an exporter of natural gas? is it that great a difference? >> we burn offer more natural gas than we use. burn off, in other words literally, you see those flames, we flare more than we use. so we got a real excess of this stuff. >> the government say
cliff? are you expecting the economy to go over the fiscal cliff and see these taxes go high hadder and spending cuts take effect? >> my personal view is i'm still optimistic. i think the conversation has been constructive since. do we have a solution on the table yet? no. but i'm optimistic we'll get to a framework. >> why? >> there's been enough dialogue. there's been movement. everyone seems to recognize the problem. everybody realizes there has to be a revenue component, spend component, entitlement reform component. for us, the business community and all the ceos, certainty is the greatest stimulus for us. >> do you support tax rates going higher? >> me personally, as an individual, more importantly the business community, which i'm part of. we support something inclusive. if rates were higher in a videocasset vacuum, i'm not sure we'd be supportive of that. we have to make sure the consumers, those who spends a lot of the dollars, the middle class, are protected in this exercise. >> i guess the question i'm really getting at is, do you get the revenue from tax increases or fro
to the economy. >> i'm wondering whether germany as we look at -- they're just above sort of recession territory at the moment. i'm wondering whether if they get better growth out of asia, that will offset the weakness that they're seeing in europe enough to keep them above the pencil line. >> what we've seen so far with today's numbers is exports are declining very sharp. they'll need asia and the u.s. to offset some of that demand weakness, but again, the biggest market for most is the euro zone. if the eurozone is performing badly, that will have a thok-on effect for those countries. >> there's a number of strategists saying after the u.s. has sort of led equities for most of the year, they're now saying europe is the place to be. from i think really the question you have to ask yourself is when cash, equities, credit, government bonds, where do you want to be. and equity in my mind mind is absolutely not. you need good growth numbers to justify the equity markets going up. now, i think there's a lot of investors looking at the yields on ghoechlt bonds or credits and that's motivating them to
're going to talk about the fiscal cliff, we're going to talk about the global economy. we're going to talk about the civil war in syria. we'll talk about the royal baby coming soon. first we want to get right to zoraida sambolin for an update on the day's top stories. >> soledad, the fiscal cliff debacle, with 28 days remaining before drastic tax hikes and spending cuts take effect, a republican spending plan has been rejected by the white house. brianna keilar is live from washington. what now, brianna? >> well, right now it's about the pressure building and the clock kicking, zoraida. as house republicans in the white house try to ultimately broker a deal between two very different plans. house speaker john boehner's counteroffer, if you take a look at the headlines from this $800 billion in what would be savings from tax reform. so that is new tax revenue. but not done by increasing income tax rate on the wealthiest. but instead by closing tax loopholes, eliminating tax credits. and also $600 billion in health savings. that's what you'd get from entitlement reform. from reforming medica
can i do? if they say, what do you think? i say, low income rates, economy recovering slowly, housing coming back, if you stay through the turmoil, you'll have higher markets after its over, and maybe much higher so my view is yoo stay invested, broadly diversified, etfs to do it. >> you had me until much higher markets on the other side. what makes you think that? as an investor, it it's a higher tax, straightforward math. if you raise tax on dividends and capital gains, makes stocks less valuable in the long run, a less appetizing choice. you mentioned housing on the way back. holding assets for a long time, buy housing, gold stocks, something to sit? >> well, you have a diversify, and stocks are under owned, one. the monetary policy is predictable for years, and it's a low, low interest rate so now you say what are the relative choices? go by a high grade tax free bond, 3% interest. i can buy stocks, a 2%-plus dividend, could tax higher, but the dividends rise. i can get into a market cheaply if i believe earnings grow over time, say, the rest of the decade. that's my time horizon.
for the american economy. >> what great news, i think. don't you think so, mark mckinnon? i loved the president's tone there, talking about how a deal could be done. and i was critical of him when he did a campaign event up in philadelphia -- or pennsylvania a couple days ago when he wasn't talking to boehner. but if he's talking to boehner one on one and they're going to start this discussion, they go out and make statements publicly and then privately, i think it's a great step forward. >> i think it's a terrific development. i think that the president and boehner created a lot of chemistry over the years and that the distractions have come from other constituencies that have been in the room. i think that they both understand that this is important to both their legacies. and so they have an opportunity for them to just deal together one on one is a terrific development. >> and the president looking -- and you as a businessperson knows this, and i think we've all been in the position of negotiating and you say, okay, do we want to deal with him, or do we want to cut him out at the knees and
to figure this out. lori: i was speaking with martin felton yesterday of harvard, the u.s. economy is still in serrous danger of falling into a recession. >> i think the fiscal cliff is the single biggest risk. if we avoid that, i think we have a good shot of growing. not rapidly, but between one and 2%. housing is recovering. i think without the fiscal cliff, we will do all right. lori: tax rates or than likely are going up, at least for one class. you have this slow growth. at the same time, think of the federal reserve keeping rates low for so long. we could be in serious trouble. >> on the inflation front, we are not very worried for the next year or two. it is out there, but not the next year or two. they will phase in whatever tax increase they put in. it will not hit next year. it will phase in over a couple years. that is the smart way to do it. lori: thank you for your time. >> thank you. you bet. melissa: i would like to be optimistic. date -- details of the probe have not been released. over 80 people have already been questioned about the more than $5 billion in trading losses l
sounds] >> if the president really wants to avoid sending the economy over the fiscal cliff he's done nothing to demonstrate it. >> we don't know who pays. we don't know what we're talking about in terms of actual legislation to increase revenues it's magic beans and fairy dust. [farting sounds] >> stephanie: all right. >> fairy dust goes very well with bourbon. >> stephanie: republicans were quick to say that boehner's plan was attracting criticism from the right particularly from jim demint of south carolina, tea party leader and as such, represented more of a compromise than obama's stance. uh no! nice try. demint said boehner's plan will destroy american jobs and allow politicians in washington to spend more. oh, please we're not falling for this. they think if they criticize the plan, oh, well it must be a good compromise then. nice try! 29 minutes after the hour. spongebob squarepants tom kenny, our buddy our pal next on "the stephanie miller show." you know who's coming on to me now? you know the kind of guys w
when they cast their ballots. we surveyed more than 4,000 voters. 31% say the economy is the most important issue in this campaign. 22% cite social security reform. 13% say energy policy. including the use of nuclear power is their top issue. we also asked voters who they believe is more qualified to be prime minister after the lower house elections. 20% say the leader of the governing democratic party . 20% say the leader of the governing democratic party yoshihiko noda, who is currently prime minister. 25% say the leader of the main opposition liberal democratic party, shinzo abe. 49% say neither. our poll also suggests the approval rating for noda's cabinet has hit a record low of 21%. that's down one percentage point from a survey taken a week ago. the disapproval rating fell by two percentage points to 62%. many of the people we spoke to seemed eager to cast ballots on december 16th. 88% told nhk they would go out to vote. >>> new auto sales in japan fell in november for a third straight month, but the pace of decline was so slow that it was almost flat. industry groups said
and the president's stance on taxes and goal with the economy and maybe what he will say in the inauguration. look who was invited to the white house >> chris: who was left to run msnbc. >> happy and ed and arihanna huffington. i don't know if the white house released the fact. but someone from the blog sites saw it. and so wait a minute what is going on. yeah, we were invited for not a strategy but just to explain. >> gretchen: i don't know why anybody. >> brian: five talk show hosts in from the same channel? that is outrageous. >> gretchen: it might be outrageous. i am not surprised by it at all. that's the message . that station is delivering the message of this administration. it makes sense. >> steve: that particular channel that's all they would do. it would be nice to see somebody from cbs or nbc or fox news channel. >> brian: it is incredible. >> steve: what do you think that the president's people invited the way left people to a sit down there at the white house. e-mail at folks news.com. >> brian: the president will not talk to republicans unless they agree to raise rates. he hasn't tal
which we do to grow the economy, in infrastructure and innovation and making sure america is always on the cutting-edge of new entrepreneurship, the fact is that we want to do that, the president has put that forward, the election does make a difference, the president is absolutely strong about this. look i was just with him on friday. he came to my district. was at a business. they are showing some of that video right now. local business in my district that was a toy manufacturer and what they said to the president, what they said to me is we, we make more toys when there's consumer demand. let's make sure that middle class americans have dollars in their pockets, they continue to have confidence as consumers or grow that confidence and that our businesses, large and small respond to that, that they begin to see so stability. this is time when we're calling on speaker boehner to work with the president, to work with democrats in congress, and to get done what we have to get done, the american people, middle class and businesses, let's create that stability and confidence that this
been struggling for months now to turn the country's economy around. today, new figures were released showing the number of people out of work is at a new record high. >> some 4.9 million spaniards are currently registered. that's an unemployment rate of some 25%, and many fear the situation is going to get worse before it gets better. >> long queues at the unemployment office had become a familiar sight in spanish cities, and they keep getting longer. the number of jobless rose for a fourth consecutive month in november. almost 500,000 more are out of work compared to a year ago. >> i wish there were more jobs. we are sinking in unemployment. >> i think the bad situation we are in is going to last at least another two years. >> the government, of course, hopes that is not the case, but so far, it has not had any success in bringing down the jobless rate. >> these are obviously very bad numbers. unemployment continues to rise. we work hard every day to try and change that. we are dealing with a crisis. >> critics at home city government's approach of cutting spending is not working. l
. belly flop the economy at once. comfortabling the know that d.c. is on top of it all. alex simpson, former senator and the guy that everyone thinks is a lifeguard at the fiscal pool. ♪ ♪ >> eric: okay, beckel is gangnam style. good to know we're in good hands but get serious, folks. >> any word from karl rove? >> despite what we're telling you, it's over. romney lost. >> i guess it's time i explain, the good people, the upcoming fiscal cliff. >> the economy is the car and rich sman a driver. don't give the driver many. they will drive you over a cliff. just common sense. >> eric: not exactly. the only way to save the republic is for us to let the president go off the fiscal cliff. taxes will go up. but mandatory spending cuts get enacted. that seems to be the only way dems will cut a dime. let's save the place for the kids. do you agree? >> greg: i do. >> bob: i think you're crazy. >> greg: funny that bob and i agree but for different reasons. fiscal cliff is a horrible med fore. i means the high grade leftism. what you get are massive cuts in defense. and higher taxes. that me
with their own economy and deal with their own people internationally. so i think that generally there's a feeling that we might be some hope there. however, we are approaching a potential violation of the u.n. security council resolution and we encourage the leadership in north korea to consider what they're doing on the overall security environment on the peninsula as well as in asia. >> did you follow up anything new? we been hearing rumblings for a time. anything new you can provide in terms of insight into lunches are things like that? >> i think you're tracking it pretty well for the media today there are indications of what they will call a satellite launch. we believe it is still the u.n. security resolutions because of the missile they'll be fired and the implications it has for ballistic missiles activity somewhere down the road and the destabilizing impact it will have on the security environment throughout the region, not just dependent. >> can you follow up on some of that? what is your assessment? they say they saw birth of her problems at their failed launch. what is you
to keep 98% of the bush tax cuts in place for the betterment of the economy. >> it's so much bigger than that. >> they have won. >> republicans won. >> we have won. tax breaks. >> so to give a couple of percentage points to 2% of people. >> it could be so much bigger because the conversation has been shifted to how do we reduce our deficit. >> brian sullivan, thank you so much. greatly appreciate your insights. thanks for being with us on "way too early." you can catch brian on cnbc's "street signs" at 2:00 p.m. he is the hardest working man in show business, or at least on the other side of the river. >>> coming up this morning, we've got republican senator tom coburn. can't wait to talk to tom. also, tom cole will be here on set. that's great. we're going to ask him what he was thinking last week. i'm joking. congressman. also, democratic senator claire mccaskill. can you believe this? and congressman chris van hollen. also, we're going to bring in former national security adviser dr. brzezinski. and straight ahead, mike allen with the top stories from "politico." and mika should be je
of los angeles and long beach, california. the strike was costing the economy an estimated $1 billion per day because it prevented shippers from delivering cargo to stores and other businesses. 40% of all goods shipped into the country come through those ports. union workers there were protesting the outsourcing of jobs. there's no word, yet, on the terms of the deal struck. >>> and speaking of the economy, there's important news for anyone who owns a home or is looking to buy. prices, skyrocketing to levels we have not seen in years. and "weekend gma" anchor bianna golodryga is here with the latest. good morning, bianna. >> reporter: good morning to you, josh. important news and good news. everyone's been waiting for the housing market to take off since the collapse in 2008. now, we're learning that home prices jumped 6.3% in october, compared to the same time last year. that's the biggest year-to-year gain since 2006. now, prices rose in 45 states, led by a 21% jump in arizona and a 13% rise in hawaii. and according to the national association of realtors, they say the number of homes a
a little sick about that bit. the economy around braille is pushing a lot of people to think about all the other forms, particularly the digital forms that are now available. many people still speak braille, use braille, create brail at the printers and spongees that are part of the braille language, we are seeing many younger leaders not use braille but rather use obviously all of the other audio and connective forms that there are in terms of communication. so many of the hand-held devices, many of them have speaking capabilities and audio capabilities and i am not going to make predictions about braille but we are seeing less and less of it. it is interesting as we talk about the transition of rail and the movement of braille to other forms one of our challenges is we have many transitions in the world of talking books. transition from braille to all the other forms. the transition from the old cassette tapes which is a technology that the national library service of the blind will stop completely at the beginning of next year. they won't be producing anything in those taped forms.
's struggles to improve its economy. >>> plus, a controversial police tool under fire today as drivers in one city claim that those traffic cameras aimed at keeping things safe, you know the ones they send you the automatic ticket in the mail for allegedly running the red light? that they're rigged! they're rigged against you and to turn a profit for police. we'll investigate. >>> and a new report today about vogue editor-in-chief anna wintour possibly being nominated as the ambassador to the u.k. and that new reporting has sparked new questions about whether the woman infamous for being rather tough on her staff possesses the diplomatic skills to deal with our best friend over in england and international relations. former u.n. ambassador john bolton faced similar criticism when he was up for his post, and he joins us next on whether he thinks wintour, infamously portrayed loosely in the film "the devil wears prada" has what it takes. >> oh, good morning, miranda. >> get me isaac. i don't see my breakfast here. where are my eggs? where's the piece of paper i had in my hand yesterday morning?
are going farther. the new 2013 ram 1500. ♪ with the best-in-class fuel economy. engineered to move heaven and earth. ♪ guts. glory. ram. share "not even close." share "you owe me..." share "just right." the share everything plan. shareable data across 10 devices with uimited talk and text. by htc for $49.99. >> dana: back with more on the murder-suicide we talked about in the "a" block. we'll talk about the possible underlying factors of the violence. listen to rush limbaugh. >> might there have been a better outcome if there had been a marriage involved between mr. belcher and his girlfriend? i don't know.l i know is that it the statistics from single parenthood and children out of wedlock and what happens to kids in those circumstances, what happens to the fathers in those circumstances. it's not good. >> dana: an degreia, i'm a believer in the institution of marriage to solidify families and root you in a grounded, make it possibly tradition and hopefully be prosperous in the future. there is a lot, there are many babies born out of wedlock. all across america. and all races. in part
and the economy of this country is so profound that i would be shocked if, that there is --. melissa: well, i don't know. you're going back to giving them a lot of credit. i'm not sure i'm willing to go there with you. what do you think of tte fact both sides come out instantly after an offer is that it is terrible? president obama was out here, blink of the eye after republicans came out with their plan to say this is not in the spirit. >> today you're talking about? melissa: yeah, today. what does that tell you? should we read anything into that or is that -- >> again i will liken it to there are plenty of people far more educated on this than i but from a negotiation standpoint i think again it is a lot about posturing. sending out your feelers. melissa: right. >> and seeing what the other side's response is to that and kind of figuring out what's the quasi-middle kbround. melissa: yeah. >> that is what the president is doing here, saying this isn't in the spirit what we're trying to accomplish. melissa: right. >> but for the president from what i can see, getting this behind him and getting t
in the iranian economy, with energy and shipbuilding and shipping and the ports, this amendment that would shut down businesses that are involved in sectors which fund the proliferation activities of iran, of that regime is crucial. in addition, the amendment is going to prohibit business with all designated persons connected to the iranian government. it bans trades in commodities used in these key sectors. it's designed to stop iran from busting sanctions by receiving payment in the gold or using oil payments in local currency then to buy gold. and we've got to stop an effort to water down these sanctions. i say that because i remember the votes in the past. i, i remember our effort on the central bank. it was only because we got the unanimous votes frankly, that we got so much support, that we were able to deploy those, but let me add that there is another portion of the amendment here that targets the regime for their human rights abuses. and i think one of the areas where we really have been short, for those of you who have talked, those of you who have been in the prisons there, that expe
't know what to do about it except continually make the economy work while we let the liberals destroyed it and then come every two years and fix it. but right now common sense, common sense is viewed as in tolerance. the nicest thing you can say to somebody no matter who it is is get a job. that is the nicest thing you can say. when you're walking down the street and there's a guy panhandling and you say get a job your complimenting him. you are saying you have the will and the means to get a job. but now these days if you save that is seen as a mean and in tolerance to assume people have the power to act of their own volition. that is where we are at, that we can't think of ourselves and assume a person can take care of themselves, you are a big debt. i never bought into the compassionate conservative thing. remember that? still playing with the unicorn. the half fell off. the compassionate conservative, being a conservative is being compassionate, takes the extra step to realize you believe in something that is better for them than giving them something. calling somebody a compassiona
administers price is. they are called taxes. so lower tax rates expand the economy and we need more revenues for the government and less zero-sum struggles over government favors. >> we been talking books tv but george gilder, author of several books with the new addition of george gilder, which came out originally in the early 80s. this is a tv on c-span 2. >> now i program from the up to the archives. fatima bhutto kameny said former pakistani prime minister, benazir bhutto, talks about growing up in a family powerbrokers. may suffer chronicles her close relatives including her own father who were assassinated by political. benazir bhutto was sworn in as prime minister of pakistan on december 2nd come in 1888. this is about an hour 15. >> back at home this evening. in the kitchen cooking at winning to my parents bedroom and sat as they watch television on the bed. he was a little child then in this so easy to take care of. we were lazily watching boston's ace, a show made in the 19th 60s about the same astronauts. there's nothing else on. sophie was laying on his stomach, hat in hand sand
's reaction, yeah. >>> also, a big bounce in home prices could mean good news for the entire economy. >> some of the hardest-hit states as well. arizona, california, florida. we're seeing a big turnaround. that's news everyone can celebrate. prices are up. >>> later this half hour, going to extremes. there is suddenly a backlash from the couponers. >> couponers. >> couponers. >> it's not coupon. it's coupon. >> i hear people say it both ways. is there a right or wrong way? >> it is coupon. i have done 7,000 stories for "gma" for couponing. >> couponing? not cue -- >> not like you are cute, it's a coup. >> oh, thank you. >> we will have a story on coupons about something. >> save money. >> whatever. >>> call it extreme sailing. meet the new speed racers of the high seas. this is not a sport for the faint of heart or for those that can't swim. >> excellent point. >>> first, though, a break in a case right here in new york. a subway death that was captured in an extremely chilling photograph. and it is now continuing to make national headlines. >> police have a man in custody, in monday's incide
to the financial pressures caused by a whole bunch of things, ranging from the internet to a tough economy. now, this is kind of a blip compared to what some newspapers, including my former paper "the washington post" have gone through, cutting hundreds and thousands of employees through buy-outs and layoffs, other methods of trimming the payroll. 30 voluntary buy-outs is nott that much. given the time to keeping that news rm big, it shows that even if you are in new york and you are a big national newspaper, you cannot be immune to the tough times facing the print business right now. >> hey, howie, thank you. love your show. >> thank you so much. talk to you again. >> howie kurtz joining us live on a number of topics. >>> also, secretary of state hillary clinton has a message, and it's for syria. use chemical weapons against your own people, and the united states will take action. what does that mean? we'll talk about it. questions? anyone have occasional constipation, diarrhea, gas, bloating? yeah. one phillips' colon health probiotic cap each day helps defend against these digestive issues w
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